Analog Ephemera and the banged up 78rpm

A 110+ year old, extant 78rpm acoustic recording
The ratty falling-apart generic 78rpm paper sleeves still maintain a kind of preciousness that I tuck away in protective plastic. I might lift the graphics for my own uses.
Additionally, a previous owner wrote the title in their own hand in one corner of a sleeve, something that brings the resale price down on a 33 1/3 rpm record but which, speaking for myself, evokes another kind of daydreaming (for instance, see here)
Record companies also advertised their artists on their generic 78rpm paper sleeve. Here we have a run-down of names you might recognize along with the gone-and-forgotten. This would seem to indicate what was selling or, at least, what was worth promoting, as well as indicating a continuum as far as “the mainstream” as opposed to its alternative, those less-popular names that made it through history’s market-grinder and who now outshine what was “popular” in another era.
Here’s the anomaly: A 7-inch 78rpm of Dean Martin produced by Capitol Records released in 1954.
Here you see RCA advertising the new 45rpm format on the generic paper sleeve of one of their 78rpms.
Art Tatum 12" 78rpm released in 1944 backed by one Slam Stewart; the octave-above humming bass player appeared on many Jazz sessions including ones with the upstart Be-Boppers
Given my parent’s leftist inclinations, this 78rpm provides for an appropriate totem. Supposedly written by an IWW (The Wobblies) organizer in the early 1900s, the song dispenses with the derogatory connotations of the term “bum”, as the lyricist preferences low-budget idleness over the possibility of being bossed around.
I do remember my parents occasionally picking up the refrain within my earshot. Released in 1928 and becoming enough of a “hit” to make a pop as well as political impact on my parents, the release date is still a little early for my father’s acquisitive instincts as a toddler. Let alone, his parents hardly having (at that time) expendable income via an allowance for their children. Which leads us back to: who originally owned it and where was it purchased?

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